Tag: mountains

Trekking in northern Vietnam

Trekking in northern Vietnam

My wife Laura and I are accompanying our daughter Allison and her boyfriend Patrick on an extended trip through Vietnam, and parts of Cambodia and Thailand. Allison spent 3 months+ in Hue, Vietnam last year on an internship for her course in International Development at the U of Ottawa. She graduated in June and we all thought this would be a great way of spending some family time time, doing what we love most: discovering new places.

I have kept a chronicle of our journey using the app TrackMyTour, the link for which is below.

We started off in Hanoi, visited Ha Long Bay, then travelled north by night train to Sa Pa, near the Chinese border, where this photo was made. From there, we went back to Hanoi then on to Tráng An (Ninh Bình), Hue, Da Nang and Da Lat. We are now in Phu Quoc for a few days before moving on to Cambodia. What an adventure Allison has prepared for (she’s done all the bookings for accommodations and transportation).

We are on sensory overload, something photographs do not convey well: a cacophony of sounds and smells and tastes and textures and a riot of cultural visuals that are overwhelming. I will be adding more photos from the collection I’ve gathered over the last few weeks, so stay tuned!

TrackMyTour.com/RVtFP

A few more from Iceland

For last few days and for two more, we’re staying on a farm about 10 minutes outside of Akureyri, in Iceland’s north. It’s snowing right now and we’ve had snow off and on over the last few days. Not a lot, but road conditions yesterday morning were a bit dicey. However, when the weather cleared, we had beautiful sunshine and more spectacular scenery of dramatic mountains, blue ocean, white snow and puffy clouds.

We drove up the coast of Eyjafjörður from Akureyri through Dalvik and three tunnels (one of which was a single lane for 3km!) to the northern village of Siglufjörður. If you watched “Trapped” – an Icelandic mini-series on Netflix – this was the town the story was based on and partially filmed in – a beautiful location surrounded by mountains and the sea. But the most dramatic scenery yesterday was just outside of Ólafsfjörður. Just off the point a brewing snow squall was lit by the afternoon sun.

We ended the day photographing a farm just south of Dalvik. The problem in Iceland is that the roads have no shoulders (and no guard rails except on a few, very few, choice curves!). In other words, there is no where to stop the car to photograph the great scenery except at farm lanes (they don’t like that!), pull-offs and picnic areas. The picnic areas are scattered along the road, some well-placed or photographers, others less so. A few hundred metres up the road from the farm there was a picnic stop – snowed in at the is time of year, but accessible, thank goodness. It was worth the trek back down the road to capture this beautiful view. It sums up the kind of day we had.

We went aback to Akureyri for dinner. Eating out is expensive in Iceland: fish and chips for two plus a couple of pints totalled about $75. Understandably, most of our meals we make ourselves, easy breakfasts of muesli and skyr (Iceland “yoghurt-like” milk product), sandwiches for lunch and dinners back at our AirBnB.

We ended the day the best way possible – soaking in hot pool. Each village and town has outdoor public pools, heated with geothermal heat. Each complex typically has a gym attached plus at lest one lane-swimming pool and at least two, often three of four, hot pools of varying degrees of warmth. This pool, near our AirBnB, is set in a valley surrounded by beautiful mountains, so sitting outside in a not pool at -2°C surrounded by the evening light with these great views was a real treat.

Here are more photos from the day…

 

Iceland in March

Right now, Laura and I are travelling through Iceland, mostly in the north. We rented and are staying at AirBnBs. It’s a great time of year as there is a dusting of fresh snow each night – not enough to obliterate detail, nor enough to make driving hazardous, but just enough to accentuate the detail of the mountains and volcanic rock.

I’m using the Sony RX10iii for all the shots. I’ve brought along my D800E with the 18-35mm lens, specifically to capture the Aurora borealis, when it makes its appearance (higher image quality at the higher ISOs needed). Otherwise, everything you see is using the RX10iii using raw capture and processing through Lightroom.